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Microsurgical Resection of a Spinal Cord Pial Arteriovenous Fistula: 2-Dimensional Operative Video. – Back Pain Doctor Harley Street

Microsurgical Resection of a Spinal Cord Pial Arteriovenous Fistula: 2-Dimensional Operative Video.

We present a patient who was diagnosed 20 yr prior to current presentation with a spinal arteriovenous malformation. This patient had a 10-yr history of worsening back pain (and underwent lumbar fusion), urinary dysfunction leading to 3-yr dependence on intermittent catheterization, lower extremity paresthesias and pain, and progressive weakness with multiple falls, leading to walker then wheelchair dependence for mobility. Magnetic resonance studies showed extensive thoracic cord expansion and edema with enlarged spinal cord surface veins and flow voids extending from spinal levels T6 to the conus medullaris. Partial embolization at an outside institution elicited transient symptom improvement. Repeated spinal angiogram demonstrated persistent T10 pial arteriovenous fistula (AVF) supplied by the posterior spinal artery arising from the right T11 segmental artery as well as by the anterior spinal artery from the left T10 segmental artery. Because additional embolization carried significant risk, we planned open surgery with fistula resection. Informed consent for the surgery and video recording was obtained. The patient was placed in the prone position, and a radial artery access was obtained for intraoperative angiogram. Following a posterior T9-T11 laminectomy and dural opening, a pial dissection was performed to expose the AVF. Intraoperative indocyanine green angiography was used to assist in identifying the feeders and major drainage of the AVF. Post-AVF resection, a formal intraoperative radial access spinal angiogram demonstrated complete resection of the lesion with no residual shunt or early venous drainage. The patient improved significantly and, on last follow-up, is ambulating without any assistive devices.

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